Journal April 16, 2018

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Looks like a new theme might be in order for the website because the homepage is not loading for me. It doesn’t work in any browser or on mobile. I contacted support and they said (with proof) that it’s working fine for them but I asked a couple of friends and it’s not loading for them either. So posts are going to be a bit infrequent until I decide on an appropriate theme.

The name ‘Never Thought To Question’ is the last remnant of a blog that was once so much more negative and aggressive in it’s approach. The title comes from a song (Judith by a Perfect Circle). It was the perfect match for two main reasons:

1. The song is very anti-religion: So was the blog. At one point the blog was specifically anti-theist. I told myself it was about the religion and not the people following it. I soon realised this wasn’t always true and began to give serious thought to how unproductive that kind of talk is. It helps no one to constantly criticize, make fun  of and belittle anything or anyone. So I changed my approach and it honestly feels a lot better. As such if I change the theme I will be changing the name to Happiness is Free. I will also add a new tagline that I haven’t decided on yet.

2. People not questioning their beliefs is the root of religion and superstition: Not entirely but true but a fairly common reason. I felt that if I could just get people to question their beliefs even for a moment then maybe I can rid the world of religion and superstition. This aggressive and negative attitude hung around for far too long. It made sense to me at the time though.

So with a change of heart, a more positive and helpful approach and a much clearer conscience a name change seems appropriate and with technical problems a new theme too. I look forward to many more positive changes.

 

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A Bad Start is Still A Start

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Picture this image of Jeff Bezos in his cheap office space working day and night selling books online.  24 years later Amazon is a 100 billion dollar multi-national corporation selling everything from toilet paper to power tools. Even better is it’s a surprisingly common story:

Phil Knight: Knight and an old friend each put up $500 dollars to start a shoe company. 50 years later the proud chairman of Nike is worth an estimated $86 billion.

Larry Page: Page and Sergey Brin started running a search engine software on their university’s servers while they were doctoral candidates. When it started taking up too much bandwith they left and started Google.  It’s now a 101 billion dollar company used by millions everyday.

Ingvar Kamprad: Used some money his father gave him to sell replicas of his uncle Ernst’s kitchen table. IKEA went on to become a 35 billion dollar company.

Bill Gates: A university dropout who used his life savings to start a software company that nobody else thought was a good idea but in 1985 Microsoft Windows was born and now runs on 91% of computers worldwide.

J.K. Rowling: Rowling was on government assistance and could barely afford to feed herself and her child. She worked diligently on a book after her child was asleep. The book went on to be on a series of international bestsellers and blockbuster movies.

Oprah Winfrey: The news reporter turned talk show host was so poor as a child she had to wear potato sacks for clothes.

The list goes on and on, a little web research shows this. Even on a less grand scale neighborhoods and cities are full of stories of people who went from rags to riches. What they all have in common is hard-work and determination. All of these self-made billionaires ignored their doubts and critics and persisted even when things were dismal. Their stories are a reminder that no matter how unlikely success might seem it is always possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mr. Rogers Movie

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Even though he was an ordained Presbyterian minister if there was ever anyone who set the example of humanist values it was Fred Rogers.   He was one of the most pure of heart and dedicated his life to improving the lives of others, especially children.  This blog wholeheartedly endorses this movie.

“Anyone who does anything to help a child in his life is a hero to me. ” -Fred Rogers

“The greatest thing that we can do is to help somebody know that they’re loved and capable of loving.” -Fred Rogers

The Miracle of Life: Against all Odds

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Science, from the outside, can seem cold and calculating. The vision many people have of the sciences is lab coats, beakers and calculators. The scientist is too often pictured as a person in a white coat with glasses conducting their experiments and crunching boring, monotonous data to come to conclusions many of us may not even understand. One of the only things we really need to understand about the sciences is why the sciences have proven our lives to be a miracle. For example take what had to happen for you to be here:

    1. The Universe had to start to exist: Scientists, for the most part, use the Big Bang as the model to describe the origins of the universe. It’s not known what caused it but was the start of a process that created the Universe.
    2. Our planet had to be createdThe Earth was created approximately 4.6 Billion years ago and lived it’s early life in a chaotic state.
    3. Our planet needed to be able to support life: Life started approximately 3.7 billion years ago (The BBC website has a very good and thorough examination). At this point the Earth had survived bombardment by comets and asteroids, super-volcanoes and many other planet destroying phenomena. The Earth also just happened to be orbiting the habitable zone of our sun.
    4. Evolution: Human evolution started aprox. 13 million years ago. For evolution to even start complex amino acids had to form (aprox. 10 to the power of 40 chance according to some).
    5. Humans have had to survive:
          1. War: Humans have been fighting wars since at least 2700 BCE when Sumer and Elam went to war. We have been fighting ever since including two world wars and multiple close calls with nuclear war.
          2. Disease: Smallpox, measles, typhus, cholera and the plague to name only a few of the many diseases we have managed to survive so far.
          3. Famine: The great famine of Ireland, The Russian Famine, The Chinese Famine of 1907 and many others.
          4. Disasters:  We have survived numerous volcanoes, earthquakes and even an ice age.
    6. Your parents had to meet (and there parents and so on). Harvard Possessor Binazir actually calculated and came up with this great infographic showing the odds of you being born. According to Binazir it’s one in ten to the power of 2.685 million. So that’s a one in ten followed 2.865 million zeros chance that you could come into existence.

This brief look at human history doesn’t even begin to explore the destruction in the cosmos (like asteroids and rogue black holes ), the miracle of evolution that gave us our complex brains and bodies fit to survive in so many of the Earth’s  environments or how the Earth is perfectly suited for life. Despite all of the wanton destruction, disease, death and mayhem of the universe and life itself here you are in the year 2018 reading this article on your electronic device.  Congratulations you have beat everything the universe could throw at you to prevent you from coming into existence.  You can now enjoy being able to take a look around and enjoy life from the vast (family, friends, career..etc) to the simple (fresh air, good food..etc). and this fact is a miracle.

 

 


Forgiveness Is…

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When one considers the stress of carrying all the resentment, anger and hate that goes with not forgiving “To forgive is to set a prisoner free and discover that the prisoner was you.” (Louis B. Smedes). Forgiveness is important for many reasons and Positive psychology says forgiveness is:

“a conscious, deliberate decision to release feelings of resentment or vengeance toward a person or group who has harmed you, regardless of whether they actually deserve your forgiveness.”

It’s also important to recognize what forgiveness is not. Forgiveness doesn’t mean idly accepting wrongdoings or forgetting that a person has a tendency to act badly in some way. ‘You do not gloss over or deny the seriousness of an offense against you. Forgiveness does not mean forgetting, nor does it mean condoning or excusing offenses. Though forgiveness can help repair a damaged relationship, it doesn’t obligate you to reconcile with the person who harmed you, or release them from legal accountability.’ (Greater Good Berkeley)

Psychology Tools has an excellent PDF defining what forgiveness is and what it is not:

Once we understand forgiveness the next step is practicing it and lucky for us experts like Robert Enright have defined a process for doing this. Enright’s  Eight Keys to Forgiveness:

  1. Know what forgiveness is and why it matters: We understand what forgiveness is and what it is not (see above). So why does it matter? Psychologically it relieves us of the burden of resentment, anger and hate. Depending on the situation forgiveness also allows for a rebuilding of damaged relationships,  closure in unfortunate situations (moving on), and the learning that goes with positive reflection on a wrongdoing.
  2. Become “forgivingly fit: Forgiveness, like most things, improves with practice. “It’s important to cultivate this mindset of valuing our common humanity, so that it becomes harder to discount someone who has harmed you as unworthy.”
  3. Address your inner pain: Know who has hurt and why. Acknowledge the bad feeling or harm that person has caused you and address it in a healthy way (i.e. talk to someone or seek professional help) “There are many forms of emotional pain; but the common forms are anxiety, depression, unhealthy anger, lack of trust, self-loathing or low self-esteem, an overall negative worldview, and a lack of confidence in one’s ability to change. All of these harms can be addressed by forgiveness; so it’s important to identify the kind of pain you are suffering from and to acknowledge it. “
  4. Develop a forgiving mind through empathy: Research shows that forgiving someone activates the parts of your brain responsible for empathy. When we forgive we begin to see why the person responsible did what they did and what issues they might be dealing with that caused them to do you harm. It works both ways: when we understand we can forgive and when we forgive can begin to understand. “Recognizing that we all carry wounds in our hearts can help open the door to forgiveness.”
  5. Find meaning in your suffering: This can be hard to do when feeling angry, resentful or hurt by someone but an important part of the process. We can learn from what went wrong and ‘try to see how our suffering has changed us in a positive way.’ Some people see it as learning experience (i.e. that’s a person I can’t trust or that person doesn’t like it when I so such and such or I need to be better prepared next time….etc.). Some people view suffering as a building of their ability to cope (resilience) “To find meaning is not to diminish your pain or to say, I’ll just make the best of it or all things happen for a reason. You must always take care to address the woundedness in yourself and to recognize the injustice of the experience, or forgiveness will be shallow.”
  6. When forgiveness is hard, call upon other strengths: Forgiveness can be hard, even seemingly impossible and in these times we can call upon other supports to help us.  We can do this by first accepting that we aren’t perfect either and forgiveness will not always be easy. We can then call upon other supports in our lives to find the courage to forgive.
  7. Forgive yourself: We can be hard on ourselves when we are the ones who have done wrong in some way. However when we forgive ourselves we “offer to yourself what you offer to others who have hurt you: a sense of inherent worth, despite your actions.”
  8. Develop a forgiving heart: I’m not one to simply copy and paste content but I could not find better words:When we overcome suffering, we gain a more mature understanding of what it means to be humble, courageous, and loving in the world. We may be moved to create an atmosphere of forgiveness in our homes and workplaces, to help others who’ve been harmed overcome their suffering, or to protect our communities from a cycle of hatred and violence. All of these choices can lighten the heart and bring joy to one’s life. Some people may believe that love for another who’s harmed you is not possible. But, I’ve found that many people who forgive eventually find a way to open their hearts. If you shed bitterness and put love in its place, and then repeat this with many, many other people, you become freed to love more widely and deeply. This kind of transformation can create a legacy of love that will live on long after you’re gone.” (Enright, 2015)

As a humanist the sentence “a legacy of love that will live on long after you’re gone” as a lot of meaning.  Humanists like myself don’t believe in the afterlife as described by religion.  Our only eternal life is the one that resides in people’s memories of us and so we strive to make that afterlife a good one and it must include forgiveness.

 

“We must develop and maintain the capacity to forgive. He who is devoid of the power to forgive is devoid of the power to love. There is some good in the worst of us and some evil in the best of us. When we discover this, we are less prone to hate our enemies.” Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

 

 

https://psychologytools.com/positive-psychology.html

https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/forgiveness/definition#what-is

https://positivepsychologyprogram.com/forgiveness/

Journal: February 9th, 2018

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Winter is hard on most people, myself included. Where I live the days are shorter in the winter so it’s easy to attribute the lack of motivation to lack of sunlight.  Officially the jury is still out on sunshine, Vitamin D and better moods. However, a 2006 study linked vitamin D deficiency in older adults with lower moods. More recently, research at the Loyola University Chicago Niehoff School of Nursing showed that vitamin D supplements improved the moods of women with type 2 diabetes and signs of depression. Experts call it the ‘sunshine vitamin’ because human skin creates Vitamin D when exposed to sunlight (info). You need the sun for many reasons, your mood being one of them. So it makes sense that when there is less sunlight your mood isn’t as good, especially during a long and cold winter.

For myself the lack of sunshine actually directly affects how often I post new material because my motivation isn’t as good during the winter. There are a few ways to fight it though:

    1. Get Outside: This is obvious but can be hard to to do when it’s very cold, or snowy or icy outside. We have to force ourselves to get out in the sun in the winter as much as we can, even when the weather isn’t so great.
    2. Tanning beds and UV lights: Ask an expert if the bed uses UVB light. You can also buy lights that give off UVB light like this one. Make sure to ask your Dr. first about proper use.
    3. Vitamin D Supplements: You may not need to go this far if you get enough sunshine but it can work great to help moods during the winter. Again, it’s best to ask your Dr. first.

Sometimes sunshine is the best medicine!

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